Catching the Bus

During my last bit of “blog-orrhea” (I just couldn’t hold it!) two weeks ago, I gave you a glimpse into riding the bus in Beijing and shared a revealing story about the unpredictability of the bus system.  In those posts I relied on other people’s pictures of bus stops.  Since then, I have taken some pictures of our actual bus stops so you can see exactly where we spend 10-40 minutes of our life standing each day.

A view of our bus stop (Wudaokou) in the morning.

A view of our bus stop (Wudaokou) in the morning.

This is the stop nearest to our apartment.  It is called Wudaokou (“5th Street Intersection”) and is a very busy stop because of its location next to the subway stop of the same name.  And despite technically being illegal, a street food vendor does brisk business in the back, much to the chagrin of the legal (and just slightly more expensive) breakfast place behind it. 

A view of our afternoon bus stop (middle of street).  The arrows show the route pedestrians take to get to the stop.

A view of our afternoon bus stop (middle of street). The arrows show the route pedestrians take to get to the stop.

This is a picture I took on my afternoon approach to our school bus stop, Qing Hua Fu Zhong (“Qing Hua High School”).  This is where both Tian and I get off in the morning to go to school, and it is also where we catch the bus back home in the afternoon.  Tian is lucky because her school is about one minute walk from the stop, whereas my school is about an 8-minute walk.

I took the picture from this angle deliberately.  First it helps you see that the bus stop is actually located in the middle of the street and you have to use the pedestrian bridge to get to it.  Second, it gives you a sense of how frustrating it can be to so close to the stop but yet so far; often I see our buses coming but have no way to run and catch them.  Oh the torture!

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2 comments

  1. what does the vendor sell? What is a quick chinese breakfast?

    1. The breakfast vendors usually sell some type of “bing”, which loosely translates to “pancake.” Some are deep fried and come with egg and/or meat inside (think basic breakfast sandwich). Others come with some green onions and a spicy sauce. My favorite are the “jian bing.”

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